Life at the end of the road

August 31, 2017

Testing the bag :-)

The old midge was pretty fierce this morning but once the sun was out and a wee breeze got up it was bearable. That didn’t happen until after 11:00am right enough but I managed to work my way around the ‘wee devils’ by staying inside blogging until almost 9:00 then going to visit my mate at the Torran Schoolhouse to blag some fresh sweet coffee.

P1040391 Walking the dug Smile

You know the stuff the Italians drink out of a percolator with enough sugar in it to stand your spoon vertically, well, not quite but you get the gist. Funny thing is, much as I love coffee like this, we never actually make it at home. Methinks if I started then I’d be drinking far too much of the stuff. So for now I’ll just keep scrounging it off me neighbours Smile

After arranging a ‘plan’ for the day’s diving and agreeing that afternoon would be best I headed back home. He’d ordered some mooring tackle from the usually very efficient Gael Force Marine  http://www.gaelforcegroup.co.uk/ However, despite several assurance it had not, as yet arrived, which is very unlike them. They started off making creels in Stornoway in the 1980’s and now are into everything from yacht chandlery to fish farm feed barges. I wouldn’t at all be surprised that if these fish farm anchors we’ve been lifting were made by them.

Back in the day when I was fishing I used to buy all my creels from them and much else besides. It didn’t matter how many years passed between my infrequent visits to their warehouse in Inverness, the directors would always remember me by name and ask how things were on Raasay. I guess that’s why they’re so successful because I kept returning and recommending them to others. I’m sure the stuff will be here tomorrow Smile

More path prep

Once back to Sonas and with the day improving I set about working on the path around the house.

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I just loosely arranged these, the wife will then keep adjusting them to find the best place for footfall and colour. Once she’s happy we can dig them in the chuckies and set them permanently. We’ve done some already around the ‘bunker’ and they look great, not only that but now the wee dug can walk around the house. The chuckies must be really unpleasant for dugs, deer and pigs, which at times is not a bad thing.

Once I’d unloaded those I set about making a border around the front of the house to separate the chuckies from the ‘meadow’. We don’t do grass cutting here at Sonas Smile

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Life is so much easier with a digger,

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you would not be moving these here by hand.

Just like riding a bike

That done we set off for the shore with our kit to go looking for another anchor by yet another disused fish farm site.

Smolt bin

Here it is some twenty years ago having smolts delivered, the chopper drops that bin in the middle of the cage then lowers it nearby to have the tipping mechanism reset before flying back to the hatchery for more.

This was once a cost effective method of transferring smolts to remote farms but now they’re all brought in by large ‘well boats’ which is a lot less stressful on the fish and staff. I had a few scary moments with those bins on a rope Smile 

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Here it is today with the picture taken from just behind where the cages would have been. The helicopter was dropping the bin on that outcrop of rock just above the centre.

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These two steel rings for the running mooring and a few more for the ‘land fasts’ being all that remain. We were thinking that there may have been some tackle left behind so got ready to check it out.

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The anchor hunting wasn’t very successful but at least the new scallop bag got a good testing Smile

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My boy is most definitely getting ‘his eye in’, we gonna really miss him when he goes to uni Sad smile

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Those are seriously good clams Smile

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May 24, 2013

So much for that then :-(

Filed under: boats, daily doings — Tags: , , , — lifeattheendoftheroad @ 5:00 am

Five thirty in the morning and I’m just out of my bunk having been in it since eight pm yesterday !! I kid you not, and I was actually lying on top of it for an hour before that almost shivering, no I’m not ill, it was boodly freezing. so much for https://lifeattheendoftheroad.wordpress.com/2013/05/22/warming-up/ . So for the first time since I joined the MV Hebrides some six weeks ago I turned on the heating in my cabin.

So with half an hour to kill before I start work I’ll write a few lines.

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It seems like Tarbert has a new lifeboat Smile

 

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This is how you remove kinks from the heavy multiplat mooring ropes, made out of eight strands, four laid left hand and four laid right they are less prone to kinks than ordinary ropes of a single lay, but still do. The ropes are streamed astern then hauled in on the capstan to untwist them.

 

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That looks very much like rhododendron to me at this house in Tarbert, if so it’s weeks ahead of Raasay’s, which is funny because both the grass and daffs were earlier on this windswept rock that is Harris.

 

In inauspicious start to Thursday morning in North Uist.

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The clam diving boat Auk UL 554, which I think is a 40’ Aquastar, leaves the berth in Lochmaddy at 7:00am.

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Heading to the fishing grounds on a scabby day.

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It was pretty fresh all day in the Minch, with extra traffic due to cancelled sailings on the Stornoway Ullapool route.

 

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Green Reefers, MV Green Freezer ploughing northwards.

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Think that was the entrance to Lochmaddy during the afternoon.

Lapwing

And before I forget, a lapwing on Raasay

 

Loch Striven2

and the Loch Striven punching north courtesy of George Rankine.

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