Life at the end of the road

August 23, 2012

Shameless plugs :-)

Filed under: boats, daily doings, Trucks and plant — lifeattheendoftheroad @ 5:25 am

My wife is home Smile Smile I may at last be able to spare some time to do some serious blogging. My efforts have been a little half hearted of late on account of me being, well to put it very mildly, TIRED. Doing the normal stuff then trying to look after boy, dug, pigs, hens and the housework has bee hard work to say the least. Add to that me trying to get to grips with Windows 7 on a new laptop with half my emails going to the wrong computer and you’ll understand why some of the stuff that I’ve promised to do has gone on the ‘back burner’ or been forgotten about. I’ve a host of fantastic dolphin pictures somewhere from ‘Oyster George’, Chris Allix of http://www.mantomonaco.com/index.php/index.html and some interesting stuff from http://www.cmassets.co.uk/en/our-work/projects/current-projects/hybrid-ferries-project.html about our new hybrid ferry.

George’s pictures will have to wait because they’re on my other laptop, but just to jog everyone’s memory there are still CD’s of the Inverarish centenary celebrations available both in the shop and from George directly.

Poster 1

A fantastic memento of an amazing day and with proceeds going to both the school and village hall already past the £100 mark ??? I think.

 

centenary

 

Chris Allix the intrepid sexagenarian kayaker who hadn’t until recently lifted a paddle for forty years is now well into the last leg of his solo charity canoe trip from the Isle of Man to Monaco.

 

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Though I see he’s still wearing red insulation tape on the starboard hand Smile

 

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You’ve got to admire Chris for taking this on in his sixties, and for keeping smiling with all those blisters.

Here’s the last entry from his blog

Posted on August 20, 2012

Joinville to Heuiliey-sur-Saone

Man to Monaco’’ – 16th August – Joinville to Bologne
I had prepared this blog last Thursday but it was corrupted before it was sent and I lost the Wi-Fi until today. I will try to remember the days paddling.
I left Joinville at the same place as I had climbed out of the lock with the 20 foot climb; fortunately the re-entry was much easier.
It was very hot and with the locks coming every 2 to 3 kilometres it was hard going. I saw a kingfisher (easily recognised for its vivid blue plumage) and what I think was an eagle soaring high above the hills along the canal.
Man to Monaco’’ – 17th August – Bologne to Langres
I realised that I was taking too long on this canal and therefore we started early to get back on time and I wanted to reach Langres (which I managed to do). The canal is very peaceful with very few pleasure craft on the canal and no commercial barges, but I was still having difficulties on the locks getting out of the kayak safely. Langres is the top of the summit and tomorrow will start the downhill locks, therefore I expect the lock problems to be reversed. On a couple of occasions I stopped paddling and listened to the silence, which was only broken by bird song and the sound of the countryside.
Man to Monaco’’ – 18th August – Langres to Heuiliey-sur-Saone
I had to start after Langres because I was not allowed to paddle through Balesmes Tunnel (4.8 kilometres), after which there were 12 locks all within a few hundred metres of each other. However as soon as I got underway my thoughts about the locks were confirmed, getting out was easy, but getting back into the kayak was difficult, and Claire was having great trouble getting to the lock to help me, so I had to portage many of the locks on my own, and I soon realised that my feet were going to get wet. The best way to re-enter the kayak was to lower it down the canal bank where the water is shallow (which is where the feet get wet) and climb in.
Man to Monaco’’ – 19th August – Rest day in Dijon.
Today I met up with my cousin Peter and his wife Janet and went around Dijon old town, unfortunately there were no champagne houses to visit but many churches and museums. It was so hot with the temperature rising into the mid 30’s.
Tomorrow I start on the River Saone, which will require a completely different skill than the canals, fortunately I have been on the Thames, but I will miss the peacefulness of the canals but not the locks! I expect a great increase in the commercial shipping, so will have to stay close to the right bank to avoid being run down by these ships which will travel much faster than any of those I have met to date.
Best Regards
Christopher M. Allix                    
http://www.mantomonaco.com
Please Donate

and here is a list of the charities that he’s supporting.

Well done Chris and good luck.

Tuesday

Well at least I managed to feed everyone before the heavens opened

 

 

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and I headed south

 

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past the gazillion pound Raasay water treatment plant Smile  This will be the plant that took years to build, was well over budget and comes complete with anti terrorist fence. It took a further year to iron out the bugs in the software!!!!! has been online now for at least six years and is now out of date Smile  Whatever happened to the good old sand filter and a few bugs to keep the immune system topped up. Funnily enough later that day I came across more ‘waterworks’

 

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Two large water tankers removing water from the main in Kyle to take it to the treatment plant in Sleat on Skye Smile Though I hasten to add that this was not due to any shortage, or at least that’s what the man said Smile Rather it was due to ‘operational issues’ sounds to me like a ‘corporate speak’ for a leak Smile

 

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Patterson’s ‘Handy one’ a small Volvo with Hiab came off the first ferry in the pouring rain with generators for the treatment plant.

 

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Serco’s SD Kyle of Lochalsh was sauntering about in the loch bearing its name resplendent in a new colour scheme, no doubt more corporate carp and a change of image Smile

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I did some hedge trimming at me folks then went for a walk with the ‘old man’

 

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This time taking a shorter route than the usual four or five mile march

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and promising that one day I’d take him up the ‘Silver Hill’ opposite,

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something that he’s done on his own many times but now his dementia prevents him from solo walks Sad smile

There was mare, in fact I’ve barely scratched the surface but its 6:20 now on Thursday and I’ve just gotta go.

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9 Comments »

  1. Morning Paul

    I tend to agree about water treatment etc. I much preferred my morning tea with proper Raasay water (brackish and brown) and a bath isn’t the same now it’s the same colour as everywhere else and with no distinctive smell.

    I have bought George’s CD, by the way – some very fine pictures and I was happy to make a contribution to good causes.

    Cheers (from a very wet Bacup)

    Sue

    Comment by Sue — August 23, 2012 @ 6:58 am

    • Ruins a good malt that chlorinated stuff Sue 🙂

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — August 24, 2012 @ 5:02 am

      • Couldn’t agree more – a drop of brackish burn water is what is needed!

        Comment by Sue — August 24, 2012 @ 8:37 am

  2. Paul, how can we get a copy of the CD is the shop on-line or will we have to mail them?

    Anne

    Comment by Anne Macdonald — August 23, 2012 @ 10:40 am

    • Wouldn’t mind a copy too Paul, so link information or order details please!

      Comment by Thomson Caravans — August 23, 2012 @ 3:27 pm

    • Hi Anne/Graham, George’s email at bottom of first picture.

      Cheers, Paul

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — August 24, 2012 @ 5:03 am

  3. Rain you say? Is there a large funnel atop your water tank?

    Comment by drgeo — August 23, 2012 @ 8:35 pm

    • Tank filling nicely now DrG but I’m still showering at work 🙂

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — August 24, 2012 @ 5:04 am

  4. Missus reckons you could bottle the Raasay Water and sell it the folks that miss it
    Hope you miss this load of liquid sunshine that’s covering Devon
    Have a good weekeend

    Comment by chrisbbbbb — August 24, 2012 @ 3:44 pm


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