Life at the end of the road

October 10, 2011

Trucks galore :-)

Filed under: boats — lifeattheendoftheroad @ 9:49 pm

Probably going to be a little boring for the ladies I’m afraid because the highlight of today has been the amount of commercial traffic we’ve had on the good ship Loch Striven. After the quiet of the previous few days with just a trickle of tourists it was a pleasant change to here the roar of a large diesel and feel the deck pitch as the heavyweights came on.

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Not only that but it was the calf sales in Portree so we’d a few trailers to deal with too 🙂

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And a coach on a ‘whisky tour’

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Pre fabricated sections for the new houses at School Park,

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that are going up very quickly and will provide fine views over the sea to the Cuilins.

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The roof trusses arrived in the afternoon,

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JST’s crane and the road sweeper left,

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as did two tractor loads of hardware for their floating pier that sailed away the other week. The first one being full of anchors and chain and the last one with the shore side steel ramps.

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Eyre plant’s immaculate Scania articulated tipper arrived with even more materials for the new houses. And we managed to do all this whilst only ‘short shipping’ 1 wee car 🙂

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The Clam dredger Our Catherine was still scraping away in the Raasay narrows

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and we were treated to a few rainbows 🙂 All in all a very busy, satisfying and quick start to the week 🙂

A busy week ahead

And that’s not the end of it by a long shot, Calor gas tanker, tar lorries for repairing the roads, more articulated lorries on Thursday and Friday and the Mull Little Theatre http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mull_Little_Theatre tomorrow.

The celebrated ‘smallest commercial theatre in the world’ is visiting Raasay for one night only to put on Hamish MacDonald’s play ‘Singing far into the night’ http://www.mulltheatre.com/shows_singing.html  about the Invergordon mutiny http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invergordon_Mutiny in 1931

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“Civil unrest, rioting and a society in turmoil as an impoverished working class feels disconnected from the roots of authority. Power is in the hands of the powerful; job losses, pay cuts and fear of poverty bring angry protests to the streets.
Glasgow 1931 – Connal MacNab, able seaman and naval boxing champion, comes home on leave to find Glasgow in the grip of political and industrial strife. At the centre of the turmoil Connal’s brother Finlay and anarchist actress Erica Thule publish a revolutionary newspaper. All three get swept up by events and emotions, the consequences of which are unimaginable and profound on a personal and an international scale.”

 

So it’s unlikely that I’ll be posting on here tomorrow night as it promises to be an interesting and possibly relevant offering. The only major mutiny in British history brought about by a coalition government and swinging cuts in pay :-) 

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12 Comments »

  1. “tar lorries for repairing the roads” …. wow, Paul, does that mean your road will get repaired as well

    Comment by carina — October 10, 2011 @ 10:03 pm

    • Morning Carina,

      well that’s the roads ‘repaired’ 😦 what a joke !!!!

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — October 14, 2011 @ 6:29 am

      • oh dear Paul, does that mean that nothing has changed on your road

        Comment by carina — October 14, 2011 @ 7:24 pm

      • Hi Carina,

        “oh dear Paul, does that mean that nothing has changed on your road”

        Nope, it’s actually much worse now because they’ve been over it with the road sweeper and made the pot holes even worse 😦 😦

        I despair

        Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — October 14, 2011 @ 10:11 pm

  2. This might be a dumb question, but I have never been on or have seen a ferry….did all that fit on the ferry in one trip?
    Is the ferry your business or do you just work for the ferry company?
    I will admit most of the mechanical stuff you blog about goes right over my head but I do enjoy your posts about it and seeing the young ones learning and working with you. I believe the more you know how to do for yourself the better off you are! And save quite a bit not paying others to do it for you!
    Looking forward to hearing about the theatre show.

    Comment by Susan — October 11, 2011 @ 1:09 am

    • Good morning Susan,

      I’m just the ‘grease monkey’ on the ferry 🙂 Sorry I never made it to the play to give you a review, got distracted by a sick sheep 😦

      Cheers, Paul

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — October 14, 2011 @ 6:32 am

  3. Whisky tour? Is there a hidden distillery on Raasay that I havent heard of? 😉

    Comment by Simon — October 11, 2011 @ 8:46 am

    • “Whisky tour? Is there a hidden distillery on Raasay that I havent heard of? ;)”

      Shhhhh 🙂

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — October 14, 2011 @ 6:34 am

  4. “the only major mutiny in British history brought about by a coalition government and swingeing cuts in pay” – is history about to repeat itself?

    Comment by francesp — October 11, 2011 @ 10:06 am

    • “the only major mutiny in British history brought about by a coalition government and swingeing cuts in pay” – is history about to repeat itself?”

      It usually does, but we seldom learn 🙂

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — October 14, 2011 @ 6:35 am

  5. Mutinies,,,,,, the British army is rife with them, there was a series of mutinies in Northern France from 1916 too 1918 which cost the lives of about 600 British troops There was one in India in 1946 by the RAF . There was a bloody big mutiny in Southampton of about 20,000 soldiers in 1919, and lets not forget the DLI Durham light infantry who mutinied in Italy in 1942-3 if I remember correctly. The Invergordon mutiny was a piddling little affair. The trouble is they get hushed up in war time. The difference was that the Invergordon mutiny was in peace time and concerned the British Navy which was always more important too the survival of the British State, also it was most likely a slow news day. If we only taught History in our schools instead of Caribbean awareness week which seems about par for teaching history now in Britain we would be aware of such things. I despair end of rant.

    Regards

    Dave

    Comment by Yorkshire Miner — October 11, 2011 @ 12:35 pm

    • “If we only taught History in our schools instead of Caribbean awareness week which seems about par for teaching history now in Britain we would be aware of such things.”

      Aye Dave and we’d be aware that FAR more sailors of Caribbean, African and Indian extraction perished in merchant ships bringing supplies to these shore in two world wars than ‘British’ ones 🙂

      Comment by lifeattheendoftheroad — October 14, 2011 @ 6:38 am


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