Life at the end of the road

September 2, 2010

Almost a swim :-)

Filed under: boats, daily doings, harbour, stonework — lifeattheendoftheroad @ 9:34 pm

That’s it, the schools are back the tourists away and now the sun comes out! After weeks of rain and grey skies Raasay is once again looking at its best. To be honest it looks good most of the time and even the crappy days have their upside, a roaring fire and chance to catch up on paperwork (as if 🙂 ) But crappy days do not belong in mid summer, at least not the number that we’ve had of late. Anyway the last week has been good and the last few days exceptional and I’ve been making the most of it.

The day started with feeding the herd a little early as the boy had an appointment at the dentists in Portree at 9:30 which meant reluctantly leaving the croft at 7:10 to catch the 7:55 ferry. Still that was no chore as it one of those mornings when even shaving is a pleasure 🙂 Portree and the roads where pretty quiet and much to my surprise we made the 10:25 ferry back complete with shopping, pig feed and a tank full of fuel, though the stupid licensing laws prevented me from buying any wine 😦

Now perhaps I’m missing something here being as I did not actually start drinking until I was 36 and have led a pretty sheltered existence up here at the end of the road. I do however do quite a bit of shopping before 10:30 and can honestly say that I’ve never seen a wino buy Buckfast, a ned buy White Lightning or a teenager buy alcopops at that time of day so what is the point ? Perhaps the city centres where, until this remarkable piece of legislation was passed were awash with alkies and pelters buying booze before 10:30 and I’ve just missed it. More likely the politicians that passed this stupid law don’t venture forth at that time and the booze industry lobby know that it won’t make the slightest difference to there bottom line, all it means is that people trying to catch ferries can’t buy a frigging drink to have with their dinner 😦

Once back on Raasay and with the boy safely deposited at school  I took a run along to the old pier to see how timber operations were going on.

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The boys were as usual hard at it with the Red Duchess three quarters full of logs ready for shipping to Inverness (I think). So after loading up some old pipe on the roof of the ‘Old Girl’ and trying to take some pictures of Danny ‘Megaskill’ in action I headed home.

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That dude is far too quick for me 🙂

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Between the precarious load on my roof and me stopping regularly to take ‘slow’ pictures it took me quite a while. Here’s one of my favourite vistas of Loch Arnish

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from ‘Snow plough corner’ on ‘Calum’s road’. I call it that because those stones were only put there about 10 years ago after the gritter nearly went over the edge, it was only by putting the blade down that the driver prevented a nasty accident.

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And here’s the Storr, a mountain I never tire of watching,

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I wonder why 🙂

Once home I even enjoyed mowing the lawn,

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though not as much as George, Mildred and Bracken enjoyed eating the clippings 🙂

After the rigours of cutting the grass and working up a sweat I headed down to my secret swimming spot in Loch Arnish.

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There’s a path from the old net shed on my croft right down to here were the old fishing boats would tie up to that metal stake to bring their catch and nets ashore. However despite stripping off and baking on the rocks for a while I never got in any further than my waist, it was bloody freezing !!!! So after drying off I contented myself with picking some mushrooms on the way back 🙂

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Here’s the old Arnish ‘net shed’

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and just check out that stonework.

All too soon it was time to go and collect my boy from school,

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though not before driving down to the new harbour to compare the view with an old post card I found of ‘Raasay Bay on Skye’ 🙂

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Looks to me like the background was drawn on afterwards.

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